Wrestling with Your Email Closing? Try: All Good Thoughts

How often have you closed an email with Best regards or All the best? Maybe you’ve tried Sincerely, Respectfully yours and Yours truly? How about Have a great day, or Enjoy the weekend? 

In all those times, have you ever stopped to think about whether you sound sincere? After all, how sincere can you appear when you send everyone your Best regards, Best wishes, and All the best — all the time? (Unless you are one happy cookie!)

Setting an intention to be in integrity with my message, I wrestled one day with the best way to close a particular email. The message imparted important, but potentially unwelcome, news. I didn’t want to offend the recipient’s sensibilities with a closing that did not match the character of the message, nor did I want to appear jaded. As my mind wrapped itself around and through the problem, divine inspiration struck. I found myself immersed in shining light with an ending I could feel really good about. I had hit upon the perfect closing, and actually, the perfect message not only for my one intended recipient, but a message for all the world — all the time:

All good thoughts.

So, why, you might ask is All good thoughts preferable to Best wishes, Best regards, Sincerely, Respectfully yours and Yours truly when closing your letter? Let me tell you what it’s done for me.

First, those three words feel resoundingly sincere to me because they echo my own commitment to positivism. Second, when closing business or personal communications, those three important words jump out to remind the writer (me) to reflect on whether my messages are sent in a win-win spirit and with good intention. Third, as recipients read my messages, they end by connecting with my stealth message reminding them to reflect on the positivity of their own responses.

In cases where All good thoughts close a note with positive news, those three words catalyze and reinforce the mental and physiological changes that emerge in response to good thoughts. A good first indicator is the slide of one’s facial muscles into a smile. When All good thoughts surround a not so happy note, those same words remind recipients to dig inside themselves to look for good, positive energy in response.

I personally use All good thoughts as a mantra in the morning and my prayer at night. This helps me open and close the day with powerfully good intentions. As a result, those three simple words have become so ingrained that when someone nearby says or does something I don’t like, my mantra bubbles up from my inner well wth a rejoinder reminding me to focus on All good thoughts, and let the rest go. Now, I can regularly choose positive emotions over bad feelings and take quick charge over negative assumptions when they manage to creep into consciousness. Yes! You can learn how to consistently let go of bad feelings as you strengthen belief in yourself, belief in good thoughts, and commitment to practicing strategies that will help you change your thoughts in the moment.

By sharing my own special All good thoughts mantra with people in my communication network, I’ve already started a trend. Several clients and friends have begun returning those favored words to me, and I am sure they are sending them out across the Universe, as well.

Have you ever wondered what would happen if All the world embraced All good thoughts? Let’s try it, and see what happens. Join the All Good Thoughts Experiment by visiting http://www.Allgoodthoughts.net. Pass it on. Twitter It. Facebook It. Write to me at donna@boldmarketingsolutions.com, and let me know how it works for you.

Thanks for visiting me at BoldBlogger. Stay tuned for new thoughts and info and share your thoughts with me. Also visit me at http://www.boldmarketingsolutions.com